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Category: Mystery Airplane

June 2016 Mystery Airplane – The Curtiss Model “N” Military Tractor

The first correct identification of VAA’s June Mystery Plane was submitted by Ulrich Rist. Wayne Muxlow, Ed Cook and Frank Nichols also submitted correct answers. An article describing the newly introduced Curtiss Model N Tractor Trainer appeared in the March 29, 1915 issue of AERIAL AGE WEEKLY.   A reprint of this article appears below. In his [&hellip…

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April 2016 Mystery Airplane: The Monsted-Vincent MV-1

Even though there was only one built, VAA aviation historians had no problem identifying the April Mystery Plane. First correct answer came from Ulrich Rist who correctly identified the four-engine aircraft as the Monsted-Vincent MV-1 Starflight. Others who supplied correct answers were: Louis Ross, James Riviere, Wayne Muxlow, Dan Shumaker, Brian Baker and Louis Ross [&hellip…

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February 2016 Mystery Airplane – the Towle TA-3

The first correct response received for the April 2016 Mystery Plane was submitted by Wayne Muxlow. He identified the amphibian as the Towle TA-3 which was built during 1930 in Detroit, Michigan by the Towle Aircraft Comany under Group 2 approval #2.291. The 8-place TA-3 was powered with two 225 hp Packard DR-980 diesel engines. [&hellip…

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December 2015 Mystery Airplane – the Bluebird

The December Mystery Plane proved to be no mystery for a number of VAA members, the first coming from Tim Cansler who identified the aircraft as the National Airplane and Motor Company’s Bluebird LP-4. Other correct answers were received from Ulrich Rist, Jim Grant, Pit Ross and Wayne Muxlow.   Amazingly it also turns out a [&hellip…

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October 2015 Mystery Plane: The Uniplane

The only correct identification of the October Mystery plane—the Johnson Uniplane—was received from Bradford Payne.  He wrote: The October Mystery plane Is a Johnson Uniplane.  It was designed by Richard B. Johnson of Chicago, IL.  Mr. Johnson was issued U. S. patent #1,887,411 on November 8, 1932 for the airplane.  One prototype was built (serial [&hellip…

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August 2015 Mystery: The Twin-Engined Langley

(Below is what the November 1941 issue of Aero Digest magazine had to say about the Langley Twin) The Twin-Engined 4-Place “Langley” Built by a New Process of Fused Plastics and Mahogany Plywood Newest entry in the plywood aircraft field is the four-place twin-engined Langley manufactured at Port Washington, NY, by the recently formed Langley [&hellip…

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June 2015 Mystery Plane: Boeing Model 8 (BB-L6)

No one correctly identified the June Mystery Plane. It proved to be a Boeing aircraft that was completed in 1920 — designated the Model 8 (BB-L6). The information we have was taken from Pete Bowers excellent book “Boeing Aircraft Since 1916” and includes photos, specs, and 3-view line drawings of the 3-place Boeing Model 8 [&hellip…

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April 2015 Mystery Plane: 1921 FETTERS “KITE

By Wesley R. Smith (Copyright 2015) The Story of the 1921 Fetters “Kite,” or, perhaps, more correctly; the; 1921 Fetters Sport Biplane, actually begins with the birth of Giuseppe Mario Bellanca on 19 March 1886 at Sciacca, Italy. Two years and 10 days later, Enea Bossi, another figure in this story, was born at Milan, Italy. Prior [&hellip…

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February 2015 Mystery Airplane: The Douglas Commuter

Like several other designers, Donald Douglas believed that a large number of pilots who had left the Air Service at the end of the war wanted to continue flying as a sport and that a market existed for an inexpensive light aircraft. In an attempt to capture a share of this market, Douglas designed a [&hellip…

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December 2014 Mystery Airplane: Emsco B-3-A

Copyright 2014 by WESLEY R. SMITH Correct answers to this “mystery plane” were received from Terry Bowden, and Wayne Muxlow. The story of the Emsco B-3-A cannot be told without telling the tale of Charles F. Rocheville. Like many such stories in the annals of aviation, it is an unusual tale, and it is true, and [&hellip…

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